Cover of: Mobilian jargon | Emanuel J. Drechsel

Mobilian jargon

linguistic and sociohistorical aspects of a Native American pidgin
  • 392 Pages
  • 0.63 MB
  • 2306 Downloads
  • English
by
Clarendon Press, Oxford University Press , Oxford, New York
Mobilian trade language -- History., Mobilian trade language -- Social aspects., Mobilian trade language -- Gra
StatementEmanuel J. Drechsel.
SeriesOxford studies in language contact
Classifications
LC ClassificationsPM1855 .D74 1997
The Physical Object
Paginationxv, 392 p. :
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL983150M
ISBN 100198240333
LC Control Number96020837

Though linguistic and extralinguistic evidence points to Mobilian Jargon's pre-Columbian origin, it was primarily spoken between and the mid-twentieth century, when it functioned as a lingua franca among linguistically diverse southeastern Native American groups, and in contact between these groups and by: 5.

By Emanuel J. Drechsel Mobilian Jargon: Linguistic and Sociohistorical Aspects of a Native American Pidgin (Oxford Studies [Hardcover] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

By Emanuel J. Drechsel Mobilian Jargon: Linguistic and Sociohistorical Aspects of a Native American Pidgin (Oxford Studies [Hardcover]Format: Hardcover. Drawing on fieldwork and archival research, Drechsel presents a grammatical, sociolinguistic, and ethnohistorical study of Mobilian Jargon, a Muskogean-based American Indian pidgin of.

The book makes an enduring contribution to Mobilian studies, to Native American linguistics and sociolinguistics, to ethnohistory, and to the comparative study of jargons, pidgins, and creoles./ the book offers an abundance of information and Mobilian jargon book rich discussion of a fascinating subject./David W.

Dinwoodie, University of New Mexico, Jrnl of Seller Rating: % positive. Get this from a library. Mobilian jargon: linguistic and sociohistorical aspects of a Native American pidgin. [Emanuel J Drechsel] -- The study of Native American languages has traditionally paid little attention to linguistic convergence, just as linguists focusing on language contact have often neglected Native American cases.

Read this book on Questia. Drawing on fieldwork and archival research, Drechsel presents a grammatical, sociolinguistic, and ethnohistorical study of Mobilian Jargon, a Muskogean-based American Indian pidgin of the Mississippi valley.

Mobilian Trade Jargon (Mobilian Pidgin, Yamá) The Mobilian Trade Jargon was a pidgin trade language based on Choctaw and Chickasaw and used throughout the American southeast.

Like all pidgins, the Mobilian Jargon has extremely simplified grammar compared to the complex sentence structure of Choctaw and other Muskogean languages. Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online.

Pages: Chapters: Creole language, Pidgin, Mobilian Jargon, Chinook Jargon, Vedda language, Portuguese-based creole languages, Malay trade and creole languages, Phono-semantic matching, Tsotsitaal, Creolistics, Language bioprogram theory, Contact sign, Afaka script Format: Tapa blanda.

Books for sale on the Mobile Indians Our organization earns a commission from any book bought through these links Mobilian Jargon: Good book on the Mobilian trade language.

The Mobile Indians: Ethnography of the Mobile tribe's history and culture. Links, References, and Additional Information Mobile Tribe: Mobile links page. Drechsel dedicates his book to the last speaker of Mobilian, so I would assume it's no longer with us. As Steve above notes though it has been absorbed into other languages as well.

Drechsel notes that it happened the other way too- local tribal languages changing the Jargon. Books, Publications The Mobilian Trade Language (aka Mobilian Jargon) is a Native American pidgin, primarily based on Muskogean languages, that was spoken in the North American Southeast until the s.

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language pidgin, or trade language with limited vocabulary, based on Choctaw and Chickasaw, languages of the Muskogean family that were originally spoken in what is now the southeastern United States (see American Indian languages;&#. Mobilian Trade Language.

Announcing the release of Mobilian Trade Language (Mobilian Jargon) Phrasebook and Lexicon (ISBN ), a beginner’s introduction to this North American indigenous author, linguistic anthropologist Dr. David Kaufman, specializes in indigenous language research, documentation, and revitalization, including producing dictionaries and teaching.

Mobilian Jargon (also Mobilian trade language, Mobilian Trade Jargon, Chickasaw–Choctaw trade language, Yamá) was a pidgin used as a lingua franca among Native American groups living along the Gulf of Mexico around the time of European settlement of the region. It was the main language among Indian tribes in this area, mainly Louisiana.

There is evidence indicating its existence as early as ISO mod. THE BOOK OF JARGON® Series & Other Apps. 19 February Cryptocurrency & Blockchain Technology An interactive glossary of the acronyms, slang, and terminology of the cryptocurrency and blockchain technology industry share.

view. 09 January Emerging Companies. Mobilian Jargon in relation to the vernaculars would come about only with the fi rst descriptions and analyses of indigenous languages, as Le Page du Pratz generated it (see Drechsel and Galloway ).

Mobilian jargon: Linguistic and sociohistorical aspects of a Native American pidgin. By EMANUEL J. DRECHSEL. Oxford: Clarendon Press, Pp.

xix, Cloth $ Reviewed by ROBIN SABINO, Auburn University This is a detailed case study of the structure, functions, and history of Mobilian Jargon. Bibliotekernes beskrivelse Looking at the significance of language contact in America, this is a grammatical and sociohistorical study of Mobilian Jargon, an American Indian pidgin.

It was used from until the midth century among groups of southeastern Native Americans, and also in their interactions with non-Indians.

Description Mobilian jargon EPUB

maps, tables. Mobilian Jargon (also Mobilian trade language, Mobilian Trade Jargon, Chickasaw–Choctaw trade language, Yamá) was a pidgin used as a lingua franca among Native American groups living along the Gulf of Mexico around the time of European settlement of the region.

It was the main language among Indian tribes in this area, mainly Louisiana. There is evidence indicating its existence as early as. Looking for books by Emanuel J. Drechsel. See all books authored by Emanuel J.

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Drechsel, including Language Contact in the Early Colonial Pacific: Maritime Polynesian Pidgin Before Pidgin English, and Mobilian Jargon: Linguistic and Sociohistorical Aspects of a Native American Pidgin (Oxford Studies in Language Contact), and more on Mobilian Jargon, pidgin, or trade language with limited vocabulary, based on Choctaw and Chickasaw, languages of the Muskogean family that were originally spoken in what is now the southeastern United States (see American Indian languages; Southeast Indian).

Although it is named for the Native American people whom early 18th-century French settlers called Mobile (and for whom the colonials. with a variety of Mobilian Jargon leads him to include a number of Creek forms in this book, and in his vocabulary, as though they were valid MJ forms.' Not only does he treat Woodward's Creek word for 'horse' as MJ, but he then cites the same form as evidence that the lingua franca Creek and Mobilian Jargon were in contact ().

Mobilian Trade Language - Mobilian Jargon. likes. Ayokpaci. Welcome to this page for Mobilian Trade Language (MTL), also known as Mobilian Jargon, Chickasaw-Choctaw Trade. Pidginization is a linguistic process that occurs when people who do not speak the same language come into contact.

It involves the simplification of the contacting language and the exploitation of linguistic common denominators. It is essentially an oral process and limited communication. Dyadic and Polyadic Kin Terms in Gooniyandi: William McGregor: ; An Integrated Vocabulary of Mobilian Jargon, a Native American Pidgin of the Mississippi Valley: Emanuel J.

Drechsel: ; Discussion and Debate; Historical Truths and Partisan Misrepresentations Stephen O. Murray: ; Book Reviews; Wittgenstein on Mind and Language (David G.

An informal Native American trade language used among the tribes of the US Southeast, primarily along the coast of the Gulf of Mexico. May have originally been the language of one particular tribe.(countable) One of the Native American people with Chief Tuscaloosa in Alabama (circa ).

(countable) A resident of the city of Mobile, Alabama. Although focused on Mobilian Jargon’s “descendant” languages, Berquinuvallon apparently applied his description also to the pidgin, if an abridged and questionable English translation that appeared within a few years after the French original (Berquin-Duvallon ; see also Crawford n.

12) is any indication:It [Mobilian Jargon] is notRead More. In Mobilian Jargon, čokəma fehna (interpreted as "jockomo feeno") was a commonly used phrase, meaning "very good". Another possible translation interprets the third and fourth lines as: [29] Chokma finha an dan déyè.

Practicing Ethnohistory is a compendium of twenty-one essays on ethnohistorical historiography. The essays, preceded by a contextualizing introduction, are organized under four topical heads: textual historiography, positive analytic methods using nontextual physical evidence, ethnohistorical synthesis, and the ethical-contextual issues of ethnohistory.

The last known fluent speaker of Mobilian Jargon survived until the late twentieth century. Mobilian is internal to Mobilian Jargon. Mobilian is a language in internal life now as it was before. It is the language Tecs use to speak to each other and to work out the cultures and the possibilities of the Tecumseh Republic.

Mobilian Jargon (also Mobilian trade language, Mobilian Trade Jargon, Chickasaw–Choctaw trade language, Yamá) was a pidgin used as a lingua franca among Native American groups living along the Gulf of Mexico around the time of European settlement of the region.

It was the main language among Indian tribes in this area, mainly Louisiana.Mobilian Jargon (pidgin, Choctaw and French based) Moghol ; Mohawk ; Moksha ; Molengue ; Mon (Austroasiatic) Mongolian ; Mono ; Mono (Uto-Aztecan) Mono (Malayo-Polynesian) Montagnais ; Montenegrin ; Motu (Malayo-Polynesian) Muher ; Mundari (Austroasiatic) Munji ; Muria.Paul Mellon Collection, National Gallery of Art.

George Catlin, Chief of the Taensa Indians Receiving La Salle. Ma Oil on canvas, /